Songshan nostalgia

I remember roaming through the vibrant, old, slightly mysterious Raohe night market for vietnamese sandwiches and medicinal herbs. And the usual late evening snack among families having dinner on tin stalls, gamblers, couples’ cute food on sticks and the constant shouting of a thousand sellers or so.

The equally vibrant, old and slightly mysterious Ciyou temple sits next to the start of Raohe street.

 

Going past the captivating facade on one lazy noon and to the back side. Unexpectedly smooth?

 

And, across the street, the wall separating Songshan neighborhood from Keelung river. Pass the gate and what do you find — an urban blue and green calmness punctuated by joggers, rowers, high bridges and a ferris wheel in the distance. Taipei both sides.

Small typical places Daejeon (1)

Flashbacks of basking in the weekend streets of Gung-dong. One of the many dense nightlife areas. All them being countless cafes, bbq’s, chicken places, karaoke and video rooms, arcades and cosmetics shops thrown together in the midst of old residential areas.

 

Outworldly new residential areas. But never too far away from the above-mentioned.

 

My visions of spring under way in the campus of KAIST polytechnic.

Read on for the many facets of this synthetic diamond…

From Greece to England

Doing some html work, waiting for the early morning flight. Inside one of travelers’ best kept secrets worldwide (the prayer room, occasionally upgraded to a whole elegant chapel).

Waiting for the afternoon flight, noticing this trip’s several supernatural undertones (“God save the trip”).

Taipei: 10 travel tips for cyberpunk tastes

~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~

1. Night markets

 

2. Night markets

 

 

 

3. Fucking night markets!

I probably need to get specific at this point.

When most people get ready to leave their job for the day, the stalls and shops of night markets start preparing for business. Around sunset and up to roughly midnight it feels like the whole city is outdoors, having dinner, socializing, playing and shopping in the streets. About a dozen big markets are scattered around Taipei plus every neighbourhood practically has its own, down to a street lined with food stalls every few residential blocks.

One could speak for hours (it has happened) about the energy and character of Taiwanese night markets. But this won’t do them justice.

Indicatively, two of the largest ones are vast Shilin and old Raohe. Locals often consider the large ones too touristy and prefer more earthy ones for their dinner, like Jingmei or Huaxi street, the “snake alley” (the latter is in the old downtown and one can still have snake and its byproducts in there; don’t miss the surrounding alleys; remember, you have cyberpunk tastes). And for your literal street wear there is Wufenpu, all dedicated to clothing.

 

2. Guanghua electronics market

 

A day+night market, complete with its alleys and eateries, selling electronics. Enough said. For good measure, right next to it you have the digital plaza, a kind of techie mall. The higher up you go on its floors the lower-level you get, from flagship stores on the ground floor to capacitors on the fifth. Interestingly, there are chances your gadgets will be recommended and your new computer modded by young women here.
(Note that an actual mainstream gamers’ mall opened next to the plaza just recently; but it’s not part of this list.)
Tip: Cash might be your friend.

 

 

 

3. Temples

You are bound to step into a documentary that you never dreamt of adding to your to-do list. Only that it will be real, everyday life.

The temple and the drone (at Confucius temple, Tainan).

It’s not only markets. Read on for decadence, glamour and crowds. Skyscrapers and noodles.

Backyard temple

Offerings at the Tianhou temple, Taipei.

The temple is dedicated to goddess Mazu, the main deity in Taiwan. (Right, the main religion in Taiwan is a local one!)

Tianhou is special for being narrowly tucked between other buildings right in Ximending, Taipei’s ultra-commercial district.