Cake of the monkey

“French bakery” is a category of stores in East Asia, where the romantic aesthetic tradition of Europe is well and alive. Tous les Jours is a popular korean chain of french bakery.

The beginning of each lunar year is usually in or around February of the “solar year”. And as everyone knows, each lunar year is the year of one animal from the chinese zodiac.

It was two years ago when I found out. When I found out that Tous les Jours prepares a lunar-year-cake design each year. Two years ago, when it was the year of the monkey.

Athens X-market

Nativity, “Basil cakes”, piles of Christmas sweets,

sponges and spices in the old downtown,

cured meat, neoclassical buildings, end-of-year shopping in the sun.

Warm inside

How about a Greek snack break…

…with the quintessential street food to choose from…

…spinach pie, the odd pizza, sausage roll, and -drum roll- eight kinds of cheese pie!

Tea house

Once, a traditional cup of tea, maybe in a tea house among verdant hills and foggy rivers…

Tea arrives with its half dozen containers (for leaves, boiling water, cooling water, used tea and more), accompanying snacks, and mosquito repellent.

In a tiny plot twist, focusing on the background…

and the view across said hills:

Everything’s inside “Bitan Scenic Area”, Taipei’s abrupt southern border; the fitting end to its unique urban continuum.

Random flashbacks Tokyo

Idoru festival; fans waiting for face time with their idols.

Ice cream is the only food that can be eaten in public, ergo vendors on subway platforms.

Octopus chandeliers.

Fab Cafe, coffee shop with 3D printers and space plants.

Refreshing cucumber on a stick.

Taipei: 10 travel tips for cyberpunk tastes

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1. Night markets

 

2. Night markets

 

 

 

3. Fucking night markets!

I probably need to get specific at this point.

When most people get ready to leave their job for the day, the stalls and shops of night markets start preparing for business. Around sunset and up to roughly midnight it feels like the whole city is outdoors, having dinner, socializing, playing and shopping in the streets. About a dozen big markets are scattered around Taipei plus every neighbourhood practically has its own, down to a street lined with food stalls every few residential blocks.

One could speak for hours (it has happened) about the energy and character of Taiwanese night markets. But this won’t do them justice.

Indicatively, two of the largest ones are vast Shilin and old Raohe. Locals often consider the large ones too touristy and prefer more earthy ones for their dinner, like Jingmei or Huaxi street, the “snake alley” (the latter is in the old downtown and one can still have snake and its byproducts in there; don’t miss the surrounding alleys; remember, you have cyberpunk tastes). And for your literal street wear there is Wufenpu, all dedicated to clothing.

 

2. Guanghua electronics market

 

A day+night market, complete with its alleys and eateries, selling electronics. Enough said. For good measure, right next to it you have the digital plaza, a kind of techie mall. The higher up you go on its floors the lower-level you get, from flagship stores on the ground floor to capacitors on the fifth. Interestingly, there are chances your gadgets will be recommended and your new computer modded by young women here.
(Note that an actual mainstream gamers’ mall opened next to the plaza just recently; but it’s not part of this list.)
Tip: Cash might be your friend.

 

 

 

3. Temples

You are bound to step into a documentary that you never dreamt of adding to your to-do list. Only that it will be real, everyday life.

The temple and the drone (at Confucius temple, Tainan).

It’s not only markets. Read on for decadence, glamour and crowds. Skyscrapers and noodles.

Four aspects of tea

Traditional shops with tea-time snacks. In Dihua street, Taipei’s old downtown.

 

Tea, tea ceramics and art exhibitions in CANS Cafe, the tranquil coffee shop in the museum of contemporary art.

 

Tea-tasting and English tea at smith&hsu tea house. Like with many other culinary inventions, when Taiwan embraces them they stop being an “imported” “copycat” thing and they become the thing. In this case, English afternoon tea.

 

…but before the scones, you have to tea-taste and select. “Taste” as in “wine tasting”: Smell the leaves in tiny jars.

Piece of trivia: The menu has a warning next to the Greek green tea against consumption by pregnant women. In Greece, “mountain tea” is considered the most harmless drink. Could mythology have damaged its reputation abroad? :]

 

Queue outside Chensanding in Gongguan, one of the most popular bubble tea stands.

Spending time in queues for specific food joints on a regular basis: a thing that will always perplex me. And the tea didn’t seem different than other good stands’ … However don’t let me be misunderstood. Taiwanese bubble tea itself is one of the best things in life.