Prints snapshots

[Edo-Tokyo Museum] Free entry: (…) atomic bomb survivor chart holders.

[2011 earthquake] Gas leakage: 1,238 gas supply points
Automatic shut off by microprocessor-based gas meter: 341 million points

[Apartment door] In case of a major earthquake, peel this sheet off and follow instructions on back.

[Shinjuku] Bitcoin can be used for payment.

Taipei: 10 travel tips for cyberpunk tastes

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1. Night markets

 

2. Night markets

 

 

 

3. Fucking night markets!

I probably need to get specific at this point.

When most people get ready to leave their job for the day, the stalls and shops of night markets start preparing for business. Around sunset and up to roughly midnight it feels like the whole city is outdoors, having dinner, socializing, playing and shopping in the streets. About a dozen big markets are scattered around Taipei plus every neighbourhood practically has its own, down to a street lined with food stalls every few residential blocks.

One could speak for hours (it has happened) about the energy and character of Taiwanese night markets. But this won’t do them justice.

Indicatively, two of the largest ones are vast Shilin and old Raohe. Locals often consider the large ones too touristy and prefer more earthy ones for their dinner, like Jingmei or Huaxi street, the “snake alley” (the latter is in the old downtown and one can still have snake and its byproducts in there; don’t miss the surrounding alleys; remember, you have cyberpunk tastes). And for your literal street wear there is Wufenpu, all dedicated to clothing.

 

2. Guanghua electronics market

 

A day+night market, complete with its alleys and eateries, selling electronics. Enough said. For good measure, right next to it you have the digital plaza, a kind of techie mall. The higher up you go on its floors the lower-level you get, from flagship stores on the ground floor to capacitors on the fifth. Interestingly, there are chances your gadgets will be recommended and your new computer modded by young women here.
(Note that an actual mainstream gamers’ mall opened next to the plaza just recently; but it’s not part of this list.)
Tip: Cash might be your friend.

 

 

 

3. Temples

You are bound to step into a documentary that you never dreamt of adding to your to-do list. Only that it will be real, everyday life.

The temple and the drone (at Confucius temple, Tainan).

It’s not only markets. Read on for decadence, glamour and crowds. Skyscrapers and noodles.

Glam folk

Upbeat Korean pansori singing.

Even in a clean-cut concert hall, lots of audience participation.

Reenactment in Incheon airport.

Incheon, known for continuously being voted the best airport in the world for eleven years now, offers real incentives for checking in early. They also include live music, of course wifi, and areas for free showers and sleep that must be seen to be believed. I hear you can find free massage armchairs (but I never check in early).

Downtown express highway

Flashbacks of walks along the Metropolitan Express Highway #3, between Shibuya and Setagaya.

Flashbacks of Tokyo. Absorbingly fascinating in a very different way than expected before getting there.

Hanbit apato

The imposing and ubiquitous apartment complexes of South Korea.

More accurately, a few of the twenty or so in the Hanbit complex, Daejeon.

Shilin residence on a rainy day

Flashbacks from the residence and gardens of late dictator Chiang Kai-Shek, one of the founders of present-era Taiwan.

PS: The current shaping of Taiwan has an interesting and bloody history, less well known to westerners than that of other east Asian countries. Even less well known is that it is not a member of the United Nations, although the tag appears on most of the older electronics and items of your household, I would guess.